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4: Contribution for children’s wellbeing

 

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  • Safeguarding is everyone’s responsibility and every practitioner understands their obligation in this area, every staff member attends regular training, both in house, and externally. The setting follows South West and GCCSB procedure and the manager is a trained DCPO as well as an accredited practitioner for safe recruitment. We comply and actively engage with all relevant statutory requirements, legislation and codes of practice. Our staff, parents, and committee are familiar with what is expected in these areas and are involved, where appropriate, in fulfilling the statutory duties.
  • Thorough risk assessments are undertaken both in setting and the surrounding grounds. (Grounds are maintained and supervised by school management committee) Risk assessments are also undertaken prior to any outing in line with our outings policy and all staff are familiar with the health and safety policies applicable to the setting. Documentation and comprehensive policies are undertaken collectively by staff to ensure ownership and a comprehensive understanding; this allows children to have the freedom to explore whilst maintaining high levels of safety. Staff are also given an employee’s handbook which outlines these areas within an effective induction procedure. All staff have undertaken food handling, storage and preparation courses and again a clear comprehensive policy is in place. The implementation of the control of substances hazardous to health (COSHH) is regularly reviewed, regulations are established and regular checks are undertaken by the local authority in line with the schools management of the building, the setting is registered with Environmental Health. These checks also cover the safety and check of all equipment, i.e. fire extinguishers, electrical PAT testing etc. Fire drills are regularly undertaken and are again discussed as well as being rehearsed, aiding understanding and comprehension and ensuring safety should an emergency arise. A comprehensive contingency plan is in place in the event of an emergency, i.e. poor weather conditions, pandemic contingency arrangements etc.
  • The behaviour policy is created by the children, for the children, this ensures they claim ownership and learn to value positive play and learning as part of a collaborative group. This is done through discussion and modelling using photographs and prompts, this also encourages safety and independence in the skills they learn and promotes discussions between adults and children. It also ensures they claim ownership and learn to value positive play and learning as part of a collaborative group. Consequences are then learnt through reinforced behaviour techniques as children learn better when they understand why they can or cannot do something. Staff employ the methods based on the ABC approach to promote positive behaviour and the high scope conflict resolution approach.
  • We use a wide range of learning environments and teaching approaches which are challenging and enjoyable. They start from, and are well matched to, the needs of individual children. They sustain their motivation and engagement and build on their previous learning; we work directly with our children to develop their independent learning skills. Play activities involve them with others in making decisions, investigating and solving problems and the pace of learning enables all children to make appropriate progress. Our children enjoy their learning experiences and our interactions with them show we have a comprehensive understanding of children’s development.
  • Children are regularly given the opportunity to discuss the effect of healthy practices on living things and observe these in ‘real terms’ linking learning and understanding, through growth and maintenance of plants and positive role modelling of staff. Pictorial timetables and prompts are used to reinforce hand washing and good practices with regards to health and safety. Helping them to understand health and hygiene is an ongoing process and the use of scaffolding , modelling, visual aids (such as a pictorial timetable) and sequencing strategies using photographs of regular hygienic and/or healthy practices (i.e. toileting sequence showing washing hands, drying hands etc), their own autonomy is carefully fostered to allow them to develop self care skills.
  • Children are given a range of opportunities and resources to develop their physical play. They are encouraged to crawl, crouch, squeeze through, balance, jump and climb with a wide range of equipment and through music and movement. Their fine manipulative skills are developed through a range of activities, play dough, sand, gloop, threading, compost, gravel, small world play, winches and pulleys etc. Physical activity is carefully planned to incorporate adult led, child led, boisterous, quieter, creative, manipulative, etc They are encouraged to notice their heart rates, breathing, stamina and strength when exercising to aid their understanding of having a healthy lifestyle. They are encouraged to consider sleep, food, drink for themselves and all living things, through planned activities, open ended questions and resources to encourage exploration and the use of a range of books, fiction and non-fiction. The children grow and care for a wide range of vegetables and fruit, which we then prepare, cook and eat. The effects of weather, changes in environment and naturally occurring events (the rabbits eating all of our cabbages!) also serve to reinforce learning in the natural world in relation to healthy lifestyles.
  • The nursery is fully inclusive and has a wide range of resources to support children with physical disability or motor impairment and they are provided with opportunities that recognise and extend their abilities. Children are valued as individuals and their needs and interests are closely adhered too. Through comprehensive, regular observations practitioners make sense of children’s behaviour, play and how they engage in the environment around them. Regular canvassing of their views in which practitioners listen to the children and act upon their contributions, ensure children learn social interaction is a two way process involving co-operation and respect for other people whilst further developing self esteem.
  • Each child has a learning journey, which begins when they become a part of the setting; this is represented by their learning diary, in which formative as well as summative assessments take place. Children and parents share home and nursery life through the diary and feedback from both the children and parents is extremely positive. Children love coming in and showing photo’s/pictures or having staff read comments made by parents on what the child has done at home, equally parents comment that children ‘cannot wait to show me what they have been doing in nursery’. Each child also has an individual plan which recognises children’s interests and starting points, informs next steps and ensures that their ideas and preferences are incorporated into the planning cycle.
  • Children have the right to participate and have their say on issues that affect them (in relation to article 12 UNCRC), it is also important that children develop a positive identity this can be achieved through an understanding that children are unique because of their experiences, family, abilities, racial or cultural heritage, characteristics and are situated within a specific cultural, historical time in society. Understanding these differences are central to the setting and it’s ethos and practitioners regularly challenge their own views in order to maintain a fully inclusive and equal setting in which everyone’s views, interests, beliefs, values, gender, cultural heritage, means, religion or belief is positively valued encouraging children to develop physically, emotionally, academically, spiritually and culturally.
  • Attachments with positive role models in a secure, respectful, trusting relationship allows them to deal with many aspects of life as they develop. Thus the strong foundations they are given ensure they are able to develop and make sense of the world they inhabit. The key person approach ensures that practitioners deliver appropriate responses to the children that best reflects and acknowledges children’s feelings and emotions. Effective role models, the use of scaffolding techniques from both peers and practitioners, kindness and consideration and an understanding and reciprocal and mutual respect for each other gives children lifelong skills of learning and reflects in a child’s personal, social and emotional development. Children are encouraged to find solutions to problems and given the skills to help them manage conflict, promote independence, and develop a sense of responsibility and integrity. These are essential life skills and give children the tools to build strong, positive relationships in the wider world.

Judgement: Outstanding

Our Priorities for Improvement:

  • Develop stronger relationships with local Health visitors to continue to build on multi agency working, linking into 2 year olds progress checks.
  • Extend ability to take account of the capacity for improvement, remaining committed to planning and implementing strategies for that improvement.

Jan 2014

f) The extent to which children develop skills for the future

  • Children develop skills for the future by being given what they need as children. Developing relationships that are genuine, meaningful and empathetic are key to giving a child what they need. Through their own developing positive self image, self esteem and understanding of themselves, through the reactions of others, children learn who they are as people and as learners.
  • Attachments with positive role models in a secure, respectful, trusting relationship allows them to deal with many aspects of life as they develop. Thus the strong foundations they are given ensure they are able to develop and make sense of the world they inhabit.
  • Children learn from each other as well as from adults, and their experiences at an early age can shape their understanding of how the social world is constructed. Skills they learn through a warm, positive environment will assist them in future when change, transition, loss may impact on their lives. Social skills learnt through collaborative play and interaction with peers fosters self esteem and autonomy within the child, it also impacts on how a child views him/herself in the future.
  • Effective role models, the use of scaffolding techniques from both peers and practitioners, kindness and consideration and an understanding and reciprocal and mutual respect for each other gives children lifelong skills of learning and reflects in a child’s personal, social and emotional development.
  • Children are encouraged to find solutions to problems and given the skills to help them manage conflict, promote independence, and develop a sense of responsibility and integrity. These are essential life skills and give children the tools to build strong, positive relationships in the wider world.
  • Staff employ the methods based on the ABC approach to promote positive behaviour and the high scope conflict resolution approach as follows:

 

  • Approach calmly-use a calm voice, gentle touch and remain neutral
  • Acknowledge children’s feelings-name the child’s emotions e.g angry or upset
  • Gather information-say what you think the problem is.
  • Restate the problem-recognise the problem again from all view points.
  • Ask for ideas and possible solutions and choose one together.
  • Be prepared to give follow up support-stay near the children.

Jan 2013